Monthly Archives: November 2015

Sharon Wolcott Skip Hall City of Surprise

Dyson named new director of Human Service & Community Vitality
S‌urprise, A‌Z (November 13, 2015) The City of Surprise has hired Seth Dyson as the new Director of Human Service & Community Vitality.

The department houses the Neighborhood Services Division, Senior Services Division and Grants Administration, with the overall goal of building partnerships to improve overall quality of life for Surprise residents.

Dyson holds a bachelor’s degree in Recreation Management from Arizona State University and a Master’s of Public Administration from the University of Utah.

Before joining Surprise, Dyson served as the Community Partnerships & Workforce Development Director for the Maricopa County Community College District.

He also worked for Catholic Newman Centers in Tempe and Salt Lake City for eight years and has seven years public sector experience in the areas of economic and workforce development.

Dyson is an Arizona native, born and raised in Springerville. He now lives in Surprise with his wife Megan and two children, Patrick (7) and Madelyn (2).

Dyson began his service to Surprise on November 9.

Sharon Wolcott Skip Hall City of Surprise

S‌urprise, A‌Z (November 18, 2015) Mainstreet®, the nation’s largest developer of transitional care properties, will open a Next Generation® property in Surprise in the fall of 2016. The transitional care center will provide post-acute care and recovery services to patients following hospital interventions or surgeries.

The new Surprise development will be approximately 70,000 square feet and located on five acres just south of Grand Avenue at the northwest corner of Parkview Place and Parkwood Drive. This physician-based health care property will have up to 100 patient rooms with a focus on the patient experience.

“From day one, the community of Surprise welcomed Mainstreet with open arms,” said Chris Alexander, Mainstreet’s senior development director. “We’re excited to be developing our latest transitional care center in this location, and look forward to being part of this community for many years to come.”

City of Surprise Mayor Sharon Wolcott says the project will be beneficial in several ways.

“Mainstreet aligns with the Council’s strategic plan of attracting specialty medical services as well as more jobs to Surprise that enables residents the opportunity to work in their hometown,” said Wolcott. “This project also represents a tremendous private capital investment in our community that positively impacts the growth and development of our city.”

The Mainstreet project was a lead provided by the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC), the regional economic development organization for Greater Phoenix that works with its 23 member communities, Maricopa County and more than 170 private investors to attract quality businesses to the region. With this project, Mainstreet is projected to create 100 new jobs and bring approximately $20 million of capital investment to Surprise. The company is headquartered in Carmel, Indiana with ongoing development

Sharon Wolcott Skip Hall City of Surprise

City’s skate park rules help promote safety, prevent damage

S‌urprise, A‌Z (November 18, 2015) With Surprise’s first skate park officially open at Surprise Farms Park, the city is asking residents to help keep the park safe and well-maintained by following the posted rules.

The rules note that the skate park is open to skateboards, scooters and in-line skates only. Prohibited use includes, but is not limited to, bicycles, BMX bikes, speed skates, caster boards, roller skates, go-peds and motorized vehicles.

If a skate park has not been specifically designed for use by the above listed prohibited items, there can be significant concrete damage associated with their use, causing the need for costly repairs.

There can also be safety-related issues with having sports equipment capable of different speeds, jumps, etc. using the park at the same time.

Skate park hours are 6 a.m. – 10 p.m. daily.

For questions related to the skate park, please contact the Surprise Community and Recreation Services Department at 623.222.2000.

Sharon Wolcott Skip Hall City of Surprise

S‌urprise, A‌Z (November 19, 2015) Mainstreet®, the nation’s largest developer of transitional care properties, will open a Next Generation® property in Surprise in the fall of 2016. The transitional care center will provide post-acute care and recovery services to patients following hospital interventions or surgeries.

The new Surprise development will be approximately 70,000 square feet and located on five acres just south of Grand Avenue at the northwest corner of Parkview Place and Parkwood Drive. This physician-based health care property will have up to 100 patient rooms with a focus on the patient experience.

“From day one, the community of Surprise welcomed Mainstreet with open arms,” said Chris Alexander, Mainstreet’s senior development director. “We’re excited to be developing our latest transitional care center in this location, and look forward to being part of this community for many years to come.”

City of Surprise Mayor Sharon Wolcott says the project will be beneficial in several ways.

“Mainstreet aligns with the Council’s strategic plan of attracting specialty medical services as well as more jobs to Surprise that enables residents the opportunity to work in their hometown,” said Wolcott. “This project also represents a tremendous private capital investment in our community that positively impacts the growth and development of our city.”

The Mainstreet project was a lead provided by the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC), the regional economic development organization for Greater Phoenix that works with its 23 member communities, Maricopa County and more than 170 private investors to attract quality businesses to the region. With this project, Mainstreet is projected to create 100 new jobs and bring approximately $20 million of capital investment to Surprise. The company is headquartered in Carmel, Indiana with ongoing development in Texas, Kansas and Colorado as well as 20 properties currently operating in Indiana.